1. Ohio Buckeye
    • Scientific name: Aesculus glabra
    • Leaf Arrangement: opposite
    • Leaf Complexity: palmately compound
    • Characteristics: the fruit contains one seed enclosed in a somewhat spiny protective layer.
    • Location: Buckeye Grove
    • Habitat: understory trees that prefer soils that are more alkaline in respect to pH
    • Interesting statement: prone to leaf blotch, leaf scorch and mildew

http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/ohiobuckeye

  1. Sugar Maple
    • Scientific name: Acer saccharum
    • Leaf Arrangement: opposite
    • Leaf Complexity: simple
    • Characteristics: bark resembled overlapping shingles made of flared vertical plates
    • Location: West campus
    • Habitat: found all over Ohio forests and meadows
    • Interesting statement: the wood is valued as a material to build floors, furniture, instruments and railroad ties because it is hard, dense, and difficult to split

http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/sugarmaple

  1. White Oak
    • Scientific name: Quercus alba
    • Leaf Arrangement: alternate
    • Leaf Complexity: simple
    • Characteristics: acorns found in great abundance
    • Location: West campus
    • Habitat: range includes all of Ohio – from dry forests, fields, and woodlands
    • Interesting statement: one of the most important hardwoods – used for lumber, railroad ties, floors, barrels etc.

http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/whiteoak

  1. Sweetgum
    • Scientific name: Liquidambar styraciflua
    • Leaf Arrangement: alternate
    • Leaf Complexity: simple
    • Characteristics: spiny, green hanging fruits dangle from the tree during summer months
    • Location: West campus
    • Habitat: only found in the Southernmost parts of Ohio; most commonly found in moist areas such as floodplains and river bottoms
    • Interesting statement: The sweetgum name is due to the hardened sap that is secreted from wounds

http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/sweetgum

  1. Hackberry
    • Scientific name: Celtis occidentalis
    • Leaf Arrangement: alternate
    • Leaf Complexity: simple
    • Characteristics: light gray bark, massive, bumpy trunks; dark brown and spherical fruit on long stems
    • Location: West Campus
    • Habitat: fencerows, fields, wastelands; grows naturally near bodies of water
    • Interesting statement: susceptible to nipple galls, which are caused by insects – results in bead like galls on the underside of the leaves

http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/hackberry

  1. Weeping Ginkgo (cultivar)
    • Scientific name: Ginkgo biloba
    • Leaf Arrangement: alternate
    • Leaf Complexity: simple
    • Characteristics: thick, leathery leaves and a very characteristic shape
    • Location: Agriculture campus
    • Habitat: grow in most parts of the world that provide temperate climates with sunlight and moist soil
    • Interesting statement: female ginkgo trees have structures nicknamed “golden apricots” whose fleshy insides are said to smell quite awful

https://bygl.osu.edu/index.php/node/640

  1. European Beech (cultivar)
    • Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica
    • Leaf Arrangement: alternate
    • Leaf Complexity: simple
    • Characteristics: grows upright in an overall oval shape
    • Location: West campus
    • Habitat: native to Europe – prefers areas with deep, rich, moist, slightly acidic and well-draining soil
    • Interesting statement: adapts better to the struggles of urban environments than the American Beech

https://hvp.osu.edu/pocketgardener/source/description/fa_atica.html

  1. Loebner’s Magnolia (cultivar)
    • Scientific name: Magnolia loebneri
    • Leaf Arrangement: alternate
    • Leaf Complexity: simple
    • Characteristics: smooth to slightly rough bark; silvery color
    • Location: West campus
    • Habitat: prefers moist and well-draining soil with full sun exposure
    • Interesting statement: the fruit of this magnolia tree is pickle shaped that matures from green to pink to red

http://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/loebners-magnolia

9. Tuliptree

  • Scientific name: Liriodendron tulipifera
  • Leaf Arrangement: alternate
  • Leaf Complexity: simple
  • Characteristics: very distinct leaves that are named after their resemblance to tulip flowers; largest solitary flower of any native Ohio tree
  • Location: Campus edge
  • Habitat: found all over Ohio; prefers moist woodlands and field edges
  • Interesting statement: Tuliptrees are the tallest trees of eastern United States forests with the straightest trunks (on average)

http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/tuliptree

10.Kentucky Coffeetree

  • Scientific name: Gymnocladus dioicus
  • Leaf Arrangement: alternate
  • Leaf Complexity: pinnately compound
  • Characteristics: thick fruit pods/legumes
  • Location: West campus
  • Habitat: found throughout Ohio; prefers more alkaline soils, bottomland forests, along streams and other moist areas
  • Interesting statement: pioneers of Kentucky used the fruit as a substitute for coffee

http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/coffeetree

https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/kentucky-coffee-tree